Step 1 :  There are two holes on the back of the harp that are 15 inches apart and threaded 10-32 .  The threading starts about 1/8 inch from the surface of the hole and goes in about 1/2 inch into the harp.  The resonator is shown in it's flattest condition.
Step 2 :  Lay the harp on it's front pillar, preferably in the crease of a padded chair or possibly between your legs while seated or standing.  Insert one of the little black screws, with the hexagonal heads, in the top hole while keeping the resonator flat, or at least not yet 3-D.  Make this screw loosely finger-tight for now.
Step 3 :  Insert the other  little black screw, with the hexagonal head, in the bottpm hole while keeping the resonator flat, or at least not yet 3-D.  Make this screw loosely finger-tight for now.
Step 4 :  There is a thin plastic lip that extends from the left edge of the back panel of the resonator.  This lip can be pushed into the double-lipped plastic edging of the side panel of the resonator, as shown.  It is easiest to start at one end and work down to the other end, which is why this tongue-and-groove connection is reminiscent of a zipper action.
Step 5 : Insert the rubber-coated threaded rod (the shorter of the two) into the resonator by first pushing it (hard, because it is intentionally a tight fit) thru the front panel of the resonator, bare threaded end first.  It should line up with the threaded insert on the back wall of the top of the resonator.  You can then turn the rod with your fingers to thread it into the insert.  Stop just before it pokes thru the insert.

These threaded rods are 1/4-20 threaded steel rod, covered in 1/4 inch ID natural latex rubber tubing.

No picture available  

Step 6 : Insert the rubber-coated threaded rod (the longer of the two) into the resonator by first pushing it (hard, because it is intentionally a tight fit) thru the bottom of the front panel of the resonator, bare threaded end first.  It should line up with the threaded insert on the back wall of the resonator.  You can then turn the rod with your fingers to thread it into the insert.  Stop just before it pokes thru the insert.

 

Step 7 :  With one hand, push the rubber-covered rod against the arm of the harp, so that the rubber tubing is squeezed slightly against the wood of the harp.  The resonator has oval holes for the little black screws, so the resonator body is free to slide and/or rotate slightly as you do this. With the other hand, tighten the little black screw to good finger-tightness, and/or use a small wrench or pliers.  It is not necessary to severely tighten these screws unless you expect to move around a lot while holding the harp.  For typical lap playing or standing & playing, good finger tight is fine.  Over tightening won't hurt the harp because the threaded inserts are steel and hard to damage, but the extra compression may cause the wood of the resonator to be compressed and damaged.  If you need to jump & move around a lot while playing the harp, you can put a washer between the nut head and the resonator to spread the pressure.
Step 8 :  Repeat step 7 for the bottom rod of the harp.
No picture available Step 9 : Wrap a rubber band tightly around the two small nicks that are cut into the bottom left edge of the back of the resonator and the left side panel of the resonator.  This is to help the zipper interface to stay closed.  For typical lap playing, this step can be omitted.
Step 10 :  A guitar strap can be attached to the bottom peg of the front of the resonator.  It is usually most comfortable to attach this end first, and to leave the upper end loose, but experiment to see if you prefer to connect them both and shimmy into it (tightening the strap length once you have it on), or to connect the top one first and toss the strap over your right shoulder and pick up the bottom of it on your left for attachment to the lower peg.  I prefer the bottom-first method shown here, in which I hold the harp in my left hand and hold the loose top end of the strap with my right hand.  I then loop the strap behind me and over my left shoulder while holding the harp slightly above playing position to keep the strap loose. (continued below)
Step 11 : (continuation) Obviously enough, connect the strap at the top end.  With this method, I don't have to adjust the strap length every time I put it on, which I find to be a good time saver.

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